Methyl B12 injections with the Comfort-in™

We have been providing needle-free injection solutions for years. We continually ask for feedback from our customers to ensure we are fulfilling their needs. Over the years, Vitamin B12 coenzyme (known as methylcobalamin or methyl B12) has become one of the more popular uses. Most people who inject it probably know it as methyl B12.

Vitamin B12 deficiency is a common concern for people with diets low in B12. For example, vegans/vegetarians and people suffering from atrophic gastritis or pernicious anaemia use B12 injections. People who have lost part of the stomach through weight-loss surgery may also require ongoing methyl B12 injections. Also, if you have other gastric conditions, you may be injecting B12.

B12 injections for children with special needs

Children with special needs such as autism spectrum disorders have experienced remarkable results with the use of methyl B12 injections. Children with dyslexiaADHD and ADD are also prescribed B12 to improve brain function and to help. You may also use B12 injections for mood stabilisation for yourself or child as well as behavioural issues. Scientists believe and studies show that B12 improves brain function and concentration.

We decided to research the use of methyl B12 in children further. We found a wealth of anecdotal and professional opinion on its use. One key issue parents and physicians reported as a downside of the treatment was the physical administering of the actual injections themselves.

The unnecessary anxiety both children and parents experience from the ordeal of injections can strain the relationship. There are reports of children becoming distressed simply by seeing both parents entering the room together. Something as innocent as holding hands with the child causes distress. This is because they begin associating it with “injection time” – which often means the child acting out with crying, kicking, etc. and a physically painful experience for both parent and child. The trauma and distress can become so overwhelming that parents frequently postpone treatment until the child is older. Others simply stop the treatment altogether. Some have reported trying anaesthetic creams at the injection site. More extreme measures like attempting to give injections to their children while they are asleep raises concerns about trust and consent which could impact the developing parent-child relationship.

The Comfort-in™ provides a unique and practical solution

Parents and professionals already face challenges when caring for their child with special needs. The child’s fear of and discomfort with needles is an unnecessary further complication. Parents do not like administering injections or seeing their child go through the repeated pain of needle injections. Needle-free jet injectors like the “Comfort-in™” are now available to make injecting for children (including self-administered injections) a simple, safe and stress-free process.

Jet injectors such as the Comfort-in™ are a realistic and practical solution to “injection time.” They are virtually pain-free, stress-free and most importantly – needle free. Do you want an alternative to needle-based syringes? The Comfort-in™ is your answer to a virtually painless injection. Do you want a more comfortable and calm solution for injecting medicine and supplements? Your solution is Comfort-in™. The “Comfort-in™” injector can be used for a variety of medicines beyond methyl B12. Your trip to the dentist, which seems quite ordinary, but is painful because of needles, can be made calmer and more pleasant by a needle-free experience.

You can request more information about using the Comfort-in™ for Methyl B12 injecting on our Inject Needle Free website.

People use Methyl B12 injections for:

Our bodies use vitamin B12 as a nutrient that helps keep our blood cells and nerves healthy and to make DNA. Researchers believe B12 deficiency in people is linked to fatigue symptoms such as tiredness, weakness and lack of energy. This is caused by the lack of B12 in our body.

Photo credit: Lucélia Ribeiro. Under CC 2.0 license.